Ahead of her time: Plautilla Nelli and her everlasting ‘Last Supper’

Plautilla Nelli, a female living in Renaissance Italy, was awarded the freedom to paint due to her station in life as a nun. This post explores the history, conservation, and technical analysis of her ‘Last Supper’. (Image credit: Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain) Continue reading Ahead of her time: Plautilla Nelli and her everlasting ‘Last Supper’

Maya in blues. Investigations on Maya blue shades in Mesoamerican codices

The Maya blue hybrid pigment is a predecessor of the modern nanocomposite. It is made of indigo and different types of clay. In this article, scientists unveil the secrets behind the synthesis of Maya blue and its use in Pre-Columbian and Colonial codices using non-invasive techniques. Continue reading Maya in blues. Investigations on Maya blue shades in Mesoamerican codices

Distinguishing the composition of medieval stained glass windows using x-rays

Non-invasive techniques are always at the forefront of a conservation scientist’s mind when working with historic artifacts. But how do we apply these techniques to stained glass windows? Check out this article about using MA-XRF as a first step for understanding the composition of medieval stained glass windows and how they were colored. Continue reading Distinguishing the composition of medieval stained glass windows using x-rays