Deadly beautiful pigments: how arsenic sulfide pigment degradation affects the degradation of paintings

Historically, artists have used arsenic pigments, among other poisonous materials, since antiquity. Beautiful but deadly arsenic pigments were not only dangerous for the artists but also are dangerous for the objects: they can readily degrade and react with other components of the complex paint system, producing irreversible damage. Continue reading Deadly beautiful pigments: how arsenic sulfide pigment degradation affects the degradation of paintings

A fluorescent party: Fluorescence spectroscopy for non-invasive characterization of artwork

Everyone has seen a fluorescent painting, but did you know fluorescence (or more-generally photoluminescence) is an effect that may be used to study cultural heritage? Fluorescence phenomena give information about a broad spectrum of materials in a non-invasive manner. Continue reading A fluorescent party: Fluorescence spectroscopy for non-invasive characterization of artwork

Nano-what? Silver nanoparticle gel for identifying pigments

The analysis of dyes and lakes is a challenging task for conservation scientists. Nanoparticles and nanocomposites have become a powerful tool to increase the power of spectroscopic techniques, exemplified with SERS. This method not only improves the detection limit but also allows non-invasive analyses. Continue reading Nano-what? Silver nanoparticle gel for identifying pigments